Australia's largest fuel terminal begins service to customers

abarrelfullabarrelfull wrote on 16 Oct 2014 09:10
Tags: australia caltex refinery


Caltex Australia's Kurnell Terminal in Sydney has this week commenced operation, reaching a significant milestone in the $270 million project to convert the historic refinery site to Australia's largest fuel import terminal.

Andrew Brewer, Caltex Australia's General Manager for Supply Chain Operations, said all of the refinery's major processing units had now been shut down for the final time after almost 59 years of service.

"This week Caltex marks two important events in its history: the safe, on-time and on-budget completion of Australia's newest and largest fuel import terminal, and the final shutdown of a great Australian refinery after many decades of service," Mr Brewer said.

"The market has changed over the refinery's lifetime but for some time now - despite all our best efforts to make it as competitive as possible - it has been at a clear disadvantage compared with more modern, larger scale and more efficient refineries in the Asia region.

"Caltex's priority is the safe and reliable supply of fuel to customers across Australia. After many decades of faithful service to New South Wales and the ACT, the Kurnell refinery's substantial contribution is coming to an end.

"We are pleased to have now transitioned to a modern import facility well-equipped to handle this important role for many decades to come."

The terminal provides 750 million litres of storage capacity and will supply fuel to retail sites and commercial customers across New South Wales and the ACT.

Mr Brewer said the successful transition to a terminal had occurred thanks to the dedication of Caltex's Kurnell team.

"We are immensely proud of the contribution made by all our employees - past and present - in refining the fuel that has kept Australia moving for almost 59 years," Mr Brewer said.

"This professionalism was again evidenced as we carried out the project to safely transition to a new terminal.

"Some of our people have now transitioned elsewhere in the Caltex business as part of our commitment to find redeployment opportunities where possible.

"Our Kurnell people have also responded positively to an extensive program of ongoing employee support we launched in 2012 to help them make a successful transition to a new career opportunity or, for many, into a well-deserved retirement.

"About 75 Caltex employees are involved in work to decommission the refinery, which will take until the third quarter of 2015."

Further site works, including demolition of redundant plant and remediation, will take a number of years.
Mr Brewer said Caltex was proud of the refinery's history.

"We have consulted with the New South Wales Heritage Council and the Australian Museum to ensure that this history is preserved for future generations," he said.

"Caltex has been collecting memorabilia from the site and has commissioned a short film.

"This month we are releasing a 400-page colour commemorative book and will be providing this to our workforce as well as to the State Library of New South Wales and libraries in the local community.

"As we look back and celebrate the refinery's immense contribution over more than half a century we also look forward and know that the economic prosperity of New South Wales will continue to be underpinned by Caltex's safe and reliable fuel supply for many decades to come."


Related News

Looking for information on the Refining sector?


Unless otherwise stated, the content of this page is licensed under Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 3.0 License